Blog

  • opening Pandora`s box

    29 Abr 2009, 20:05

    SInce one of you, my dear Pandorians, suggested that I should keep the links of previously posted video links (on front page), I`m adding them here. If anyone of you has not seen them yet, I warmly recommend you spare few minutes ;D


















  • Corde Oblique`s new release

    1 Mar 2009, 20:54

    The stones of Naples - Out 30th March!

    listen to the preview here!

    if there`s someone who still hasn`t heard about Corde Oblique, here`s a perfect introduction:



  • Obit, Blog of the Dead

    23 Nov 2008, 12:41

  • The Art that Hitler Hated

    24 Oct 2008, 7:53


    Kathe Kollwitz and German Expressionist Printmaking

    from
    ~To Shout In The Ruins~
    Louis Aragon
    (October 3, 1897 – December 24, 1982)
    I remember so many things
    So many evenings rooms walks rages
    So many stops in worthless places
    Where in spite of everything the spirit of mystery rose up
    Like the cry of a blind child in a remote train depot..
  • Civitas Veri sive Morum

    22 Oct 2008, 10:00

    "Intelligent discontent is the mainspring of civilization.
    Progress is born of agitation. It is agitation or stagnation."
    - Eugene V. Debs


    Civitas Veri sive Morum
    (‘The City of Truth; or, Ethics’)
    1609
    an allegorical recasting of Aristotle's Nichomachean Ethics.


    Lovely Scans at Giornale Nuovo
  • Jacques Henri Lartigue

    20 Oct 2008, 20:31

    imprints of joy



    Sojourns in the Parallel World

    We live our lives of human passions,
    cruelties, dreams, concepts,
    crimes and the exercise of virtue
    in and beside a world devoid
    of our preoccupations, free
    from apprehension--though affected,
    certainly, by our actions. A world
    parallel to our own though overlapping.
    We call it "Nature"; only reluctantly
    admitting ourselves to be "Nature" too.
    Whenever we lose track of our own obsessions,
    our self-concerns, because we drift for a minute,
    an hour even, of pure (almost pure)
    response to that insouciant life:
    cloud, bird, fox, the flow of light, the dancing
    pilgrimage of water, vast stillness
    of spellbound ephemerae on a lit windowpane,
    animal voices, mineral hum, wind
    conversing with rain, ocean with rock, stuttering
    of fire to coal--then something tethered
    in us, hobbled like a donkey on its patch
    of gnawed grass and thistles, breaks free.
    No one discovers
    just where we've been, when we're caught up again
    into our own sphere (where we must
    return, indeed, to evolve our destinies)
    --but we have changed, a little.
    ~Denise Levertov~
  • Francesco Arena & William Basinski

    14 Oct 2008, 21:34

  • 21 February 1911

    12 Oct 2008, 20:31

    I live my life here as if I were entirely certain of a second life, as if for example I had entirely gotten over the failed time spent in Paris, since I will strive to return soon. Connected to this, the sight of the sharply divided light and shadow on the street paving.

    For a moment I felt myself covered in armor.

    How distant, for example, are the muscles of my arms..

    ~The diaries of Franz Kafka~



    Igor Mukhin - Contemporary Russian Photography
  • être au monde

    12 Oct 2008, 9:25



    être au monde
    (to be in the world)
    photographs by Isabelle Rozenbaum
    introduced by Jim Casper
    Lens Culture

    It is an amazing experience to open this stack of photos at random, and then to look at one card and then another. The dream-like connections that arise, as you go from one to the next, are simultaneously bizarre and understandable, horrifying and amusing. Certain images stick with you, others surprise you after you have looked at them for a second or third time. They are not simple images - they are rich, multi-layered, disturbing, and definitely dreamlike..more..
  • In a Dark Time ... The Eye Begins to See

    11 Oct 2008, 11:25

    Giovanni Battista Piranesi ~ Italian Neoclassical Engraver, 1720-1778




    It is said that the first idea of the Prisons came to Piranesi in the delirium of fever. What is certain, however, is that this first idea was not the last; for some of the etchings exist in early states, in which many of the most characteristic and disquieting details of the Prisons we now know are lacking. From this it is to be inferred that the state of mind expressed by these etchings was, in Piranesi, chronic and in some sort normal. Fever may originally have suggested the Prisons; but in the years which elapsed between Piranesi’s first essays and the final publication of the plates, recurrent moods of confusion and acedia and angst must have been responsible for such obscure but, as we now see, indispensable symbols as the ropes, the aimless engines, the makeshift wooden stairs and bridges.

    Piranesi`s complete graphic works