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  • FloydEloy

    Surrealism..

    21 May 13:45 Responder
  • ChaCro1313

    I have always loved these early works of Guru-Guru!

    21 Ene 20:04 Responder
  • bobgreen623

    also for me, the label 'krautrock' is fairly misleading and unnecessary apart from, as has been noted elsewhere, a useful 'catch-all' phrase. I prefer to think of it as maybe a more inclusive 'European Rock', or maybe Northern European (as there is definitely a different stylistic content in, for instance, Italian prog), which would include a wider range of bands like for instance Univers Zero, Etron Fou, etc as well as the equally genre-defying Rock In Opposition bands - all of these bands (maybe not so much Guru Guru with their blues-stoner-rock vibe) seem to be another step, or two or three, removed from the influence of the blues which was prevalent in the UK/USA when 'krautrock' first started.

    23 Dic 2013 Responder
  • abunono

    Well, I don't think the term 'Krautrock' ever did mean that much. It was supposedly coined by a generally apathetic or hostile music press (British?) to lump the German bands together under a tag. The music scene in Germany at the time was apparently very nebulous so it's good to see some folk attempting to redefine categories other than 'Krautrock' although I'm guilty myself of using it as a catch-all reference :) alfapp is correct about checking out the history a bit - my take on it is rebellion and identity and if you can imagine that in the context of post World War 2 West Germany maybe one can understand where many of the German bands were coming from. [2]

    31 Oct 2013 Responder
  • ZSRR

    Guru Guru: attracting substance abuse since 1970.

    25 Ago 2011 Responder
  • Amondroid

    Sorry crystaltrips, I think I'd had a little too much to drink on the previous post. It won't happen again, I'll get a breathiliser fitted to the keyboard to stop the drunken meanderings!!!!!

    27 Ago 2009 Responder
  • Roncsipar

    love the watery sounds at the end

    14 Ago 2009 Responder
  • crystaltrips

    Whooooosh! F*ck Krautrock, let your ears do the talking!

    14 Jul 2009 Responder
  • Amondroid

    I always thought that "krautrock" ( the term invented by the British music press) was meant to be derisive of the new music coming out of Germany, the German bands were probably offended by this, later some bands took up the tag. Buy there were too many different "types" of "Kraut"-rock for it to be something a straight forward as a cultural statement, perhaps it was rebellion, many of the bands started out as a-political, but professionalism took over. I prefer to think of Krautrock as the unusual type of German rock music, Amon Duul started out as krautrock, their first 2 albums, but they developed musically. Faust were and remain krautrock, Kraftwerk started out that way, then changed.

    22 Jun 2009 Responder
  • hinehead

    Well, I don't think the term 'Krautrock' ever did mean that much. It was supposedly coined by a generally apathetic or hostile music press (British?) to lump the German bands together under a tag. The music scene in Germany at the time was apparently very nebulous so it's good to see some folk attempting to redefine categories other than 'Krautrock' although I'm guilty myself of using it as a catch-all reference :) alfapp is correct about checking out the history a bit - my take on it is rebellion and identity and if you can imagine that in the context of post World War 2 West Germany maybe one can understand where many of the German bands were coming from.

    9 Jun 2009 Responder
  • IamianaimaI

    The actual term "Krautrock" is so nebulous at this point that it really doesn't mean much anymore, for me anyway. Setting aside its dubious origin, there is a tendancy to call anything slightly avant/forward-looking that came out of Germany during this time Krautrock.

    26 May 2009 Responder
  • alfapp

    This Krautrock music is often a product of the social and political circumstances in 1968 and the following years in Germany. You should know a bit of these years, then you will get close, Amondroid. But maybe only German minds can fully understand ....

    25 May 2009 Responder
  • Amondroid

    It's all bloody good stuff, but why were there so many German bands making this music and hardly anyone else in the world coming close to it?

    10 May 2009 Responder
  • ZSRR

    lol @ my shout from 2007.

    17 Mar 2009 Responder
  • buryyou

    Ich mag Grobschnitt lieber

    14 Mar 2009 Responder
  • RODRUIL

    Ah, Totalmente Tibetano.

    5 Mar 2009 Responder
  • RODRUIL

    Julian Copes Krautrock Sampler: GURU GURU is what an all heavy metal band should be. This track is amazing, the way it goes from Concrete to Heavy metal. Impressive. Landing of a SPACE DOME on the Nazca lines.

    5 Mar 2009 Responder
  • hinehead

    Well, whether the world needs it or not it's out there. Some really agreeably offensive noise - like it.

    23 Feb 2009 Responder
  • Jirikpirik

    REALLY STRONG PIECE!!! Not for everyday listening, but for ther very special time...

    20 Feb 2009 Responder
  • unico2469

    dunno if the world needs this piece of noise

    2 Feb 2009 Responder
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