• crushtor escribió...
    • Suscriptor
    • 28 May 2007, 8:55

    EAEWDL Book Club

    G'day Literary fiction fans! Or whatever! Here's something Last.fm can't catalogue - books! (Unless there is some kind of freaky book-tracking website out there...) I like reading books sometimes, it's a great accompaniment to music and shit.

    So, what books have you read lately?

    Right now, I am reading "Settling Accounts: Return Engagement" by Harry Turtledove. It's an alternate history thriller that delves into a world where the Confederate States won the War of Secession and those who live in it. This is the 7th book in the series so far and deals with an alternate World War II where the CSA, allied with France and Britain (under Fascist governments) have started bombing New York, Washington D.C. and Philadelphia ahead of a blitzkrieg campaign.

    I recently gave up on "The Idiot" by Fyodor Dostoevsky and am also skimming through "The Art of War" by Sun Tzu.

    You turn nows

    Rock n' roll music is the best kind of music. | Crushtor.net
    • pauxcide escribió...
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    • 28 May 2007, 9:21
    I absolutely love "Brave New World" by Aldous Huxley. I've read it twice now, within the past few months. The novel is intended to be a satire on communism and human nature, as well as the concept of a utopia. Excellent, excellent book, it won me from the very first chapter.

    But I also love "Catcher in the Rye" by J.D. Salinger, yet it's so easy for people to hate. It requires a deeper understanding of the symbolism and meaning behind Salinger's words for it to be at all interesting to the reader. Otherwise, who would find a whole novel about a boy riding on the subway, renting a hotel room, and walking down the street very entertaining? :P

    • [Usuario eliminado] escribió...
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    • 28 May 2007, 10:41
    Even though Catcher in the Rye's symbolism practically hits you on the head with a brick...

    I've been reading "Kafka on the Shore" by Haruki Murakami, recently, alongside "1984" (George Orwell) and Out of this Furnace (Thomas Bell), two books my father threw at me. The first book is quite an interesting book, but I have no idea how to begin explaining it. It was on some bestseller list though, so that makes me a tool! (or something...) Next on my list is Snow Crash by Neal Stephenson, and in between all of those I switch between No Logo (Naomi Klein) and Beyond the River (Ann Hagedorn, nonfiction book about the underground railroad) as some sort of nonfiction feeding to make sure my brain doesn't go completely numb.

    I'd much rather read a book in silence rather than have background music, I find it distracts me more often than not.

    • [Usuario eliminado] escribió...
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    • 28 May 2007, 11:16
    Readin iz 4 fagz lulz!!!!11

    • crushtor escribió...
    • Suscriptor
    • 28 May 2007, 13:25
    ur gay kyle lolz

    Rock n' roll music is the best kind of music. | Crushtor.net
    • Greyhawk escribió...
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    • 28 May 2007, 14:36
    spectrevr said:
    Even though Catcher in the Rye's symbolism practically hits you on the head with a brick...

    Dem's fightin' words (for all the Rye fans).

    I read quite a bit, although lately my choices have been limited. I'm on The Wind-up Bird Chronicle by (the above mentioned) Haruki Murakami, which is quite something actually. Recommended reading to people who enjoy books that plod on very slowly yet seem to entrance you with its bizarre charms anyway.

    Also reading Hamlet, which is my favourite of Shakespeare's plays. You know, just good reading. The language can be difficult for a lot of people, but after reading a few of his plays you find it much easier.

  • Well, today...

    'Fabricating the Keynesian Revolution' (David Laidler), 'Interpreting Mr Keynes' (Warren Young), and 'His Dark Materials' (Phillip Pullman)

    I wish the symbolism of Keynes' 'General Theory...' had hit Hicks on the head when he constructed the ISLM diagram.


    • Greyhawk escribió...
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    • 29 May 2007, 9:57
    Why is everyone into His Dark Materials?

    • crushtor escribió...
    • Suscriptor
    • 29 May 2007, 10:59
    Bah? I got a new book through Amazon.com (i'm so Web 2.0) It's called "The Games People Play" by Dr. Eric Berne. Very eye-opening manual on how people play games, verbally and psychologically with one another. Everyone should read it.

    Rock n' roll music is the best kind of music. | Crushtor.net
  • Well, I love HDM (as the cool kids call it) cos its anti-establishment while still being very moral, anti-church while being pro spirituality, and also a nice antidote to the horrible LOTR ~ Narnia school of fantasy where everyone knows their place


    • [Usuario eliminado] escribió...
    • Usuario
    • 29 May 2007, 14:27
    Greyhawk said:
    spectrevr said:
    Even though Catcher in the Rye's symbolism practically hits you on the head with a brick...

    Dem's fightin' words (for all the Rye fans)

    I'm just saying that the symbolism in Catcher is obvious, and you'd have to be pretty dense not to at least see it.

    • pauxcide escribió...
    • Usuario
    • 30 May 2007, 3:12
    spectrevr said:
    Greyhawk said:
    spectrevr said:
    Even though Catcher in the Rye's symbolism practically hits you on the head with a brick...

    Dem's fightin' words (for all the Rye fans)

    I'm just saying that the symbolism in Catcher is obvious, and you'd have to be pretty dense not to at least see it.


    I wouldn't say that. There are plenty of individuals who completely lack the ability to find and comprehend symbolism.. believe me, I spent a whole year outside of honors :P But yes, if you are speaking to a more educated audience, this is very much true. The symbolism is very profound, but a number of people I known have thrown it aside on the bases of it being "boring, and stupid".

    • [Usuario eliminado] escribió...
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    • 10 Jun 2007, 3:21
    Both of Craig Clevenger's books (The Contortionists Handbook and Dermaphoria) are well worth your time and effort. Though the second one can be a bit of a mindfuck. Which isn't necessarily a bad thing.

    The Stranger by Albert Camus is good too for all you existentialists. And I know there's at least several here.

    Also, Snow Crash is fantastic, anyone who likes Snow Crash should read Neuromancer by William Gibson and anyone who likes Neuromancer should read Snow Crash.

    • crushtor escribió...
    • Suscriptor
    • 12 Jun 2007, 5:21
    Hmm, I might get into Snow Crash...who's it by?

    Rock n' roll music is the best kind of music. | Crushtor.net
    • [Usuario eliminado] escribió...
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    • 12 Jun 2007, 7:21
    i returned bridget jones' diary to the library only yesterday!

    • [Usuario eliminado] escribió...
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    • 13 Jun 2007, 16:15
    crushtor said:
    Hmm, I might get into Snow Crash...who's it by?


    Neal Stephenson.

  • OMFGWHEREDIDSPECGO?!?!?!?!

    :'( :'(

    - rachel <3
  • "Hey everybody, look at us, we read!!!"

    I don't like this kind of elitism.

    • [Usuario eliminado] escribió...
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    • 14 Jun 2007, 6:08
    Is that because you don't read or you disapprove of reading being considered elitist?

  • amoscowdisco said:
    OMFGWHEREDIDSPECGO?!?!?!?!

    :'( :'(

    Who knows? :P

    • crushtor escribió...
    • Suscriptor
    • 14 Jun 2007, 10:22
    BigLukeB said:
    Is that because you don't read or you disapprove of reading being considered elitist?


    He's an Elitist Against Elitism He Doesn't Like...last I checked, this was the name of our group!

    Also, I'll check the Rowdy for that Snow Crash book. Thanks yo! I might borrow some Tom Wolfe as well...any suggestions there?

    Rock n' roll music is the best kind of music. | Crushtor.net
  • crushtor said:
    He's an Elitist Against Elitism He Doesn't Like...last I checked, this was the name of our group!


    Or is he an elitist against Elitists Against Elitism We Don't Like?

  • Elaine: These are good people, Jerry. They read!
    Jerry: I read!
    Elaine: Books, Jerry.
    Jerry: Oh.

    My predicament is quite similar, elitist pig-dogs.

  • Music magazines count, provided they do lots of articles about Opeth.
    Opeth kick the ass of any 'classic literature' any day of the week

    Went and spent a day on Harborne High Street today, with its charity shops and bought 'High Fidelity' by Nick Hornby, ' Reasons to be Cheerful' by Mark Steel, 'Road To Wigan Pier' by Orwell, 'Angela's Ashes' by Frank McCourt and 'Moby Dick', all for less than £10

    If Moby Dick isn't better thanLeviathan I shall demand my 50 pence back


    • [Usuario eliminado] escribió...
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    • 15 Jun 2007, 14:28
    I defy you to read it without having the album playing nonstop in your head

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